The Second Annual Wear Pants to Church Day is on December 15th.  Women are invited to wear pants or purple or both.  Men are invited to wear purple. (And pants!)

Let me state clearly that, just like last year, this is not a protest.  I cannot say this emphatically enough.

This is not a protest.

It is not political.  It is not angry. It will not distract in any way from the worship of the day by any measure on our parts.

It is an action of inclusivity and love.  It is like a reverse bat signal.  Instead of asking for help, we’re offering it.  It is a beacon.   It is an action beacon of love and welcoming.

Last year I think we were all a little surprised out how vitriolic the response to Pants Day was.  There were lots of people participating for lots of different reasons, but many of us joined in because of the reaction that the organization got on the internet.  There was so much hatred and offensiveness coming from those who opposed the idea, that it shocked me into participating, even when I had initially been unsure about it.  I was so glad I did it, in the end.  And I’ve continued to wear pants to church whenever I felt like it.  (So comfortable and convenient with young children to wrestle!)

But, I will especially be wearing pants on December 15th, because I, again, want to show solidarity.  I want it to be a symbol of the fact that I firmly believe there is room for everyone in the pews at church on Sunday.

I believe there is room for my LBGT brothers and sisters and their families.

I believe there is room for single brothers and sisters.

I believe there is room for women who feel devalued by the patriarchy of the church.

I believe there is room for women who seek priesthood ordination.

I believe there is room for single parents.

I believe there is room for politically diverse Mormons.

I believe there is room for divorced members.

I believe there is room for the poor and down trodden.

I believe there is room for couples struggling with infertility.

I believe there is room for couples who have chosen not to have children.

I believe there is room for “Cafeteria Mormons” who can’t swallow all the doctrine but find value in some of it.

I believe there is room for members who struggle with the history of the church.

I believe that there is room in the pews at church for anyone who has ever left the church because they felt marginalized, unloved, unwelcome, invisible.

I will be wearing pants on December 15th as a beacon to these people, that they will know there is room for them at church on Sunday, in the pew next to me.

If you feel the same, please join us.

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Leah Marie has lived all over the country, and currently resides in Virginia, nestled in the Blue Ridge Mountains. She earned a BA in Political Science at BYU, and a Masters in Public Administration at Boise State. She is currently working towards her PhD in Public Policy through Walden University. She is wife to an English professor, and mother to 3 beautiful boys.

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