Injustice in a Just World

I have always clung to the idea that the vast majority of people are basically good. At the same time, a look at history or the news makes quite clear that even good people are capable of doing some pretty horrible things.  Why is this? Back in the 1960s a psychologist, Dr. Marvin Lerner, became disturbed by the tendency for the...

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Introducing a Mormon Womanism

Mar 05, 14 Introducing a Mormon Womanism

Posted by in Faith, Featured, Feminism, Mormonism, Racism

In Alice Walker’s text In Search of Our Mother’s Gardens, Walker identifies a term called womanism. The term itself is derived from the word “womanish” or opposite of “girlish” i.e. frivolous, irresponsible, not serious. Walker goes on in describing it as “a black feminist or feminist of color.” Since the book was...

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Three Newly Discovered Early Black Mormon Women

Three Newly Discovered Early Black Mormon Women Connell O’Donovan February 9, 2014 Two digitized missionary journals accessible on the LDS Church History Library website have proved to be valuable sources of information on the early membership of three black Mormon women. Stephen Post’s 1836 journal of his mission from Kirtland...

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Why the Priesthood and Temple Ban Was Wrong

Feb 06, 14 Why the Priesthood and Temple Ban Was Wrong

Posted by in Featured, Racism

While reading the title of this post, people will say, “Well duh, of course it was wrong—you don’t need to write a post about it!” It might be obvious to some, and even more obvious after the Church published a web page disavowing all racism. Let’s get their exact words in here: “Today, the Church...

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Who Do You Say God Is? – Walker’s Womanism and Thoughts On A Black Christ

Feb 05, 14 Who Do You Say God Is? – Walker’s Womanism and Thoughts On A Black Christ

Posted by in Faith, Featured, Racism

Well, us talk and talk about God, but I’m still adrift. Trying to chase that old white man out of my head. I been so busy thinking bout him I never truly notice nothing God make. [1] Since the inception of the word “womanist” in 1983, the term itself and its meaning has ebbed and flowed through public and private discourse as...

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Reflections on Martin Luther King Jr. and Mormonism

There is a stark contrast between Dr. King’s “Dream” speech and his letter from Birmingham. In the former he spoke of unification; in the latter he spoke of shattered dreams. From Birmingham he wrote, “In spite of my shattered dreams of the past, I came to Birmingham with the hope that the white religious...

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Why No Apology for the Priesthood Ban?

Observant Mormons are urged to speak no ill of the Lord’s anointed, which is generally understood to be the leadership of the Church.  Elder Dallin H. Oaks expanded on this in the February 1987 Ensign where he taught that Latter-day Saints should not criticize Church leaders, adding, “It does not matter that the criticism...

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Addressing The Black Elephant In The Room

Note: This essay first appeared on Janan’s blog, A Life Diasporatic.  Please click on THIS LINK to visit her blog and read her other wonderful essays. Addressing The Black Elephant In The Room In the time since my baptism, there has always been a black elephant in the room, that is, the topic of the effect of the...

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All Are Responsible: Why I Tell Hard Stories About Mormons and Race

Dec 12, 13 All Are Responsible: Why I Tell Hard Stories About Mormons and Race

Posted by in Featured, Priesthood, Racism

In a recent conversation with Doug Fabrizio, I made the comment that the priesthood ban was a collaborative endeavor, with plenty of culpability to spread around throughout the various strata of the Mormon community.  I said that it has taken this long for the Mormon community to feel ready to engage in this discourse.  He...

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Race and the Priesthood

Race and the Priesthood by Viliami Pauni December 6, 2013 a link to a Church web page appeared in my Facebook news feed that dealt with “Race and the Priesthood.”1 I stared at the link and hoped. As I read through it the first time I was deeply moved. As I read through it a second time I was a little surprised at how honest and...

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